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FL3 

Alachua 

.G142 

25.2 

1975 

C.2 



lunity 



Development 
for 



Plan 



E.D. 1644 




i..'>i-i-..,.»<,i'..-™i* 



Department of Community Development 



Gainesville, Florida 



The Bailey mansion/ built over a century ago, symbolizes 
the idea of neighborhood conservation. The old structure has 
since been completely restored and is now used as a convalescent 
home for the aged. 



NEIGHBORHOOD ANALYSIS — GENERALIZED 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN 



Enumeration District 1644 



City of Gainesville 



Florida 



June, 1975 



Department of Community Development 



The preparation of this report was financed in part through 
a comprehensive planning grant from the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development. CPA-FL-04-29-1070 



BIBLIOGRAPHIC DATA 
SHEET 



1. Report No. 

GF DCD 750 2 



3. Recipient's Accession No. 



4. Tide and Subcitle 

Community Development Plan for Enumeration District 
1644 



5. Report Date 

June, 1975 



7. Author(s) 



Fred Flowers - principal author 



8. Performing Organization Rept. 

No. GF DCD 7 50 2 



9. Performing Organization Name and Address 

Department of Community Development 

City of Gainesville, Florida 

P.O. Box 490, Gainesville, Florida 



10. Project/Task/Work Unit No. 
505.0 



32602 



11. Contract /Grant No. 

CPA FL-04-29-1070 



12. Sponsoring Organization Name and Address 

Department of Housing and Urban Development 
451 Seventh Street, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20410 



13. Type of Report & Period 
Covered 



14. 



15. Supplementary Notes 



16. Abstracts ^^^g report inventories and analyzes demographic and land 
use factors of enumeration district 1644, Gainesville's oldest 
inner city area. 

The results of these analyses are synthesized into a land use/ 
zoning plan proposal for the area, which, as accurately as possible, 
reflects the citizens' goals and preferences for physical improvements/ 
redevelopment within a framework of neighborhood preservation 



17. Key Words and Document Analysis. 17a. Descriptors 

Demographic and land use analysis 
Neighborhood Conservation 
Land use/zoning plan proposal 



17b. Identifiers/Open-Eoded Terms 



17c. COSATI Field/Group 



18. Availability Statement 

Available from: National Technological 

Information Service 
2285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virgin; 



19.. Security Class (This 
Report) 

UNCLASSIFIED 



20. Security Class (This 
Page 

UNCLASSIFIED 



21. No. of Pages 



22. Price 



•ORM NTIS-39 (REV. 3-72» 



USCOMM-OC t4»sa-P72 



22151 
ii 



city Commission 

Joseph W. Little, Mayor-Commissioner 
Aaron A. Green 
Russell W. Ramsey 
James G. Richardson 
W. S. Talbot 



City Plan Board 

John S. Winnie, Chairman 
Harry H. Daugherty 
Donna D. Faxon 
Ira J. Gordon 
Samuel N. Holloway 
Earl M. Scarborough 
Mrs. Daniel B. Ward 



City Manager 

B. Harold Farmer 

Department of Community Development 

Norman J. Bowman, Director 

Richard A. Kilby, Assistant Director 

Delores K. Newton, Administrative Secretary 

Planning Division 

Carleton J. Ryffel, Planner III 

Fred H. Flowers, Planner III 

John V. Carlson, Planner II 

V. Miles Patterson, Graphics Coordinator 

Don Brande<^, Planning Aide I 

Louie Wilson, Administrative Clerk 

Glenn R. Edwards, Planning Aide 

Babette E. Herring, Secretary II 



111 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Abstract ii 

List of Tables vii 

List Qf Maps ix 

Introduction 1 

Limitations of Data 1 

Section I: The Planning Area Environment 3 

A. Boundaries and Description of the 

Study Area 4 

B. Community Origins 6 

Section II: Factors Influencing Land Use 8 

Introduction 9 

A. Demographic Factors 10 

B. Comparative Economic and Labor Force 

Characteristics 16 

C. Transportation 21 

Section III: Inventory of Existing Land Uses 31 

A. Residential Development 3 2 

1. Housing Supply, E. D. 1644, 1974 32 

2. Summary of Structural Quality of 

Dwelling Units, E. D. 1644, 1972 33 

3. Averages for Housing Value, Land 

Area, Building Area and Age of 
Structure for Single Family 
Residences by Traffic Zones, E. D. 

1644 36 



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B, Profile of Neighborhood Oriented Commercial 38 

Developments 

C. Summary of Land Use Inventory, E. D. 1644 39 

Section IV: Planning Issues and Neighborhood 

Improvement Strategies, E. D. 1644 41 

Introduction 42 

A. Rehabilitation and Deterioration Defined 43 

B. Planning Issues and Strategies 45 

1. Redevelopment and Neighborhood 

Conservation 45 

2. Pressures Toward Land Use 

Transition 46 

3. Housing Deterioration 47 

4. Community Facilities Improvement 49 

5. Transportation 50 

6. Neighborhood Commercial Center 

Decline 50 

7. Citizen Participation - The Inner 

City Neighborhood Development 

Association (ICNDA) 51 

C. Community Development Budget Priorities, 197 5 53 

Section V: Conservation District Plan, E. D. 1644 54 

Introduction 55 

A. Purpose and Objectives 56 

B. Definition of Conservation District 57 

C. Land Use Provisions 58 

D. Use Districts and Permitted Uses 59 

E. Amendments to the Approved Conservation 

District Plan 64 



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F. R-lc Lot and Building Requirements 66 

G. Special Regulations 67 

Appendix I Environmental Assessment of 

Land Use Plan, E. D. 1644 69 

Major References 72 



VI 



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LIST OF TABLES 



PAGE 



Table 1 - Age and Sex Distribution, Black Population, 

1644 Area, 1960 11 

Table 2 - Age and Sex Distribution, Both Races, E. D. 

1644 , 1970 11 

Table 3 - Population Shift, 1960-1970, E. D. 1644 12 

Table 4 - Black Population Decline, E. D. 1644, 1960- 

1970 12 

Table 5 - Household Formation, Household Size, E. D. 

1644/ 1960-1970 13 

Table 6 - Percent Distribution, Occupational 

Characteristics-Census Tract 2; Gainesville, 

1970 17 

Table 7 - Percent Distribution, 1969 Family Income-Census 

Tract 2; Gainesville 18 

Table 8 - Comparative 19 69 Family Income Characteristics 19 

Table 9 - Education and Employment by Occupational 

Grouping and Race " 20 

Table 10 - 1974 Average Daily Traffic Counts for 

Periphery Streets to 1644 24 

Table 11 - Recommended Intersection Improvements, E. D. 

1644 26 

Table 12 - Housing Supply, E. D. 1644, 1974 32 

Table 13 - Summary of Structural Quality of Dwelling Units, 

E. D. 1644, 1972 33 

Table 14 - Averages for Housing Value, Land Area, Building 
Area and Age of Structure for Single Family 
Residences by Traffic Zones, E. D. 1644 36 

Table 15 - Profile of E. D. 1644 Neighborhood Oriented 

Commercial Developments 38 



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Table 16 - Summary of Land Use Inventory, E. D. 1644 39 

Table 17 - Community Development Budget Priorities, 

1975 53 

Table 18 - R-lc Lot and Building Requirements 66 



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LIST OF MAPS 



Map 1 - Vicinity Map, E. D. 1644 



PAGE 



Map 2 - Ethnic Composition and Distribution, E. D. 

1644 15 

Map 3 - 1974 Average Daily Traffic Counts, E. D. 

1644 25 

Map 4 - Proposed 10th Street/12th Street One-Way Pair, 

E. D. 1644 29 

Map 5 - Proposed Bicycle Routes, E. D. 1644 30 

Map 6 - Percent Substandard Housing Units by Blocks, 

E. D. 1644 34 

Map 7 - Average Housing Conditions by Enumeration 

Districts, 1973 35 

Map 8 - Average Structural Age and Average Total 

Assessed Value by Traffic Zones, E. D. 1644 37 

Map 9 - Distribution of Public and Semi-public Uses, 

E. D. 1644 40 

Map 10 - Land Use Plan, E. D. 1644 68 



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Introduction 

This document is intended to serve as background information 
for the establishment and implementation of a comprehensive 
program for the revitalization of one of Gainesville's inner-city 
areas. The purpose is to identify and analyze socio-economic, 
residential and nonresidential conditions, and to use this 
information as a basis for outlining appropriate community 
development strategies within this area. 

Limitations of Data 

A major problem relating to data limitations stems from 
the obsolescence of the information used. Particularly, 
this is true of demographic , social and economic census data 
which have become relatively outdated since 1970. 

With reference to "Section II: Factors Influencing 
Land Use," which discusses 1644 demographic factors compared 
with the Gainesville city limits; in all instances where 1960 
data for enumeration district 1644 is indicated the following 
comments should be noted. Census data in 19 60 was not 
specifically available on an enumeration district basis. Therefore, 
where 1960 data is listed for 1644, the area referred to is the 
same general geographic location of the area which was designated 
as enumeration district 1644 by the 1970 census. 






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Regarding "Section II: Comparative Economic and Labor 
Force Characteristics"; because 1970 census data on family 
income was also unavailable for the City of Gainesville on 
the enumeration district level, the information is listed 
for census tract (2) of which enumeration district 1644 
constitutes a major portion. More specifically, the black 
population in tract 2 is virtually the same population group 
as the black population for enumeration district 1644. 

Although there are data limitations, it can be stated 
that the analysis was conducted with the best information 
available at the time. It is believed that this data 
provided a sufficiently broad base from which a sound 
assessment of 1644 could be made. 



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Section I: The Planning Area Environment 

A. Boundaries and Description of the Study Area 

B. Conununity Origins 






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A. Boundaries and Description of the Study Area 

The study area is bounded on the north by NW 8th Avenue, 
on the east by NW 2nd Street, on the west by NW 13th Street, 
and on the south by NW 3rd and 2nd Avenues. It is located 
within one mile of the Central Business District (CBD) and the 
University of Florida. (See Vicinity Map) 

The community is bisected by NW 6th Street, a major 
north/south arterial and by railroad tracks which run parallel 
to NW 6th Street. The bisection of the community into eastern/ 
western halves is further accented by the presence of the 
Gainesville Police Station, also located on NW 6th Street. The 
major east/west artery through enumeration district 1644 is 
NW 5th Avenue which traditionally has been the commerical 
and cultural-entertainment center of the area. 

The northwest "5th Avenue" community is one of the oldest 
areas in the city. Although the area is predominantly Black, 
it also includes a small transient student population and a 
relatively well defined settlement of White homeowners along 
its southern boundary. For the sake of convenience, the "5th 
Avenue" area will be referred to throughout this report as 
"1644," which is the census enumeration district designation. 






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B. Community Origins 

The "5th Avenue" vicinity is the original settlement area 
of Gainesville's Black population and, as such, is one of the 
oldest sections of the city with some houses dating back to the 
Civil War Era. Its growth and decline as a residential area 
has been tied to the growth and expansion of the overall city. 

Prior to 1850, most of the Black population of the 
Gainesville vicinity lived on plantations as slaves. This 
particular northwest section of the city had its beginnings 
when it was purchased and settled by a well-to-do planter and 
slave owner named Major Bailey. (The old Bailey mansion, 
built by his slaves, still stands on NW 6th Street and is 
currently being used as a convalescent home.) The vicinity 
I was first settled by Blacks at about the same time that 

Gainesville was just beginning as a town in 1853. The town's 
population then numbered less than 300 persons. 

The vicinity began to solidify its present location with the 
establishment in the 1870 's of a school for Black children on 
what is now NW 2nd Street. From the nucleus of ex-slaves, who 
had become freed men during the Civil War, the population steadily 
increased to about 3,000 persons in the early 1900 's. This 
comprised approximately 40% of the total city population. 



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Then, as much as now, the central location of the conununity 
was of prime importance as Blacks settled near the downtown 
square because of poor transportation means and because of the 
need to reside close to places of work, commercial activities 
and available health and social services. 

As a predominantly Black community, it once consisted of a 
much larger geographical area than today. Black businesses were 
originally grouped near the courthouse square near Main Street 
and University Avenue. As Gainesville continued to expand and 
increase in population, these businesses and other Black 
landholdings were decreased so that by 1940 the community's 
present boundaries were firmly established. 



Source: A Community Center for the Black Community of 

Gainesville, Florida, 1973; Negro Life In Gainesville, 
1938. 






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Section II: Factors Influencing Land Use 
Introduction 

A. Demographic Factors 

B. Comparative Economic and Labor 

Force Characteristics 

C. Transportation 



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Introduction 

Data on factors influencing land uses are important to 
the planning process in that it represents the cumulative 
history of the development of an area. The ways in which 
land is used and the demand for different types of uses are 
in turn influenced by the growth and composition of the 
area's population, age distribution, ethnic composition, 
household formation and household size. This section will 
present and discuss these demographic factors for the 
1644 planning area in comparison with the Gainesville city 
limits. 



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A. Demographic Factors 

There have been significant changes in both the number of 
persons and the composition of the population residing in the 
1644 area. A comparison of the 1960 and 1970 populations shows 
that there has been an upward shift in the distribution of ages 

As tables 1 and 2 indicate, there are now: 

(1) a smaller percentage of young children (26.2%); 

(2) a smaller percentage of the adult working class 
(48.8%) ; 

(3) and a rather significant increase in the 55 and 
over age group (25%) since 1960. 

These general changes in the age distribution are further 
reflected in Table 3, which illustrates percentage increases 
and decreases among the various age groups. 



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Table 1* 
Age and Sex Distribution^ Black Population^ 1644 

Area - 1960 



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% D 


istribution 


Corresponding 


Age Group 
J 1553 


Male Female Total 
1801 3354 




By Age 


City-wide % 








under 14 


567 


573 


1140 




34% 


N/A 


' 15-54 years 


761 


937 


1698 




50.6% 


N/A 


11 55 and over 


225 


291 


516 




15.4% 


N/A 



Table 2* 
Age and Sex Distribution Both Races, E. D. 1644, 1970 



% Distribution Corresponding 
Age Group Male Female Total By Age City-wide % 



under 14 


305 


317 


622 


26.2% 


23.3% 


15-54 years 


530 


629 


1159 


48.8% 


65. 5% 


55 and over 


227 


336 


593 


25.0% 


11.2% 



Totals 1062 1312 


2374 


100.0 


% 100.0% 


% Black Population 

in 
E. D. 1644 




91.8% 

or 
2179 persons 




Corresponding City-wide 


U 


18.7% 

or 
>,041 persons 





Source: U. S. Census 

*See page 1 "Limitations of Data," for explanation of same. 



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Table 3 
Population Shift, 1960-1970, E. D. 1644* 

% Change 
Age Group % Distribution, 1960 % Distribution, 1970 1960-1970 



under 14 


34.0% 


26.2% 


-9.8% 


15-54 years 


50.6% 


48.8% 


-1.8% 


55 and over 


15.4% 


25.0% 


+ 9.6% 



- Reasons for the overall upward shift in the age distribution 
from 1960 to 1970 can be attributed to the out-migration of 
younger adults and their families to the southeast and northeast 
sections of the city, leaving behind an elder and generally more 
dependent age group. Tables 4 and 5 reflect this point. 

Table 4* 
Black Population Decline, E. D. 1644, 1960-1970 

I960 3354 

1970 2179 



*See page 1 "Limitations of Data," for explantion of same. 



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Table 5* 
Household Formation, Household Size, E. D. 1644, 1960-1970 

E. D. 1644 Number of Households Average Household Size 

1960 923 3.73 

1970 855 2.8 

Referring back to Table 2, the composition of the 1644 
population for 1970 differs from the composition of the overall 
Gainesville (city limits) population in several significant aspects 

(1) For the city — the percentage of population in the 
economically productive age group (15-54 years) is 
vastly greater than the comparable 1644 age group; 

(2) For 1644 — the percentage of population among the 
elderly and less economically productive age group 
(55 and over) is significantly larger than the city- 
wide percentage; 

(3) Regarding the percentage of young children, the most 
economically dependent group — the percentage of 

this group for the city population is slightly smaller. 



See page j^" Limitation of Data," for explanation of same. 



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All of these demographic trends -- the upward shift in age, 
decrease in households and household size, and an overall decrease 
in population numbers — have important implications on the 
demand for various land uses, particularly the demand for different 
types of residential development within 1644. 

The upward shift in age distribution is important as 
there are fewer young adults tending to establish new households, 
either as single adults or through the process of family and 
household formation. It is generally assumed that families with 
young children tend to prefer single family type housing; whereas 
households without children (the elderly retired non-homeowners) 
tend toward a slightly higher density type of housing such as town- 
houses, condominiums or garden apartments. Because of the various 
demographic changes in the 1644 population since 1960, one concludes 
that there is a greater demand for housing specifically designed 
to accommodate the needs of the elderly and a relatively smaller 
demand for the traditional single family type housing. 

In addition, the overall decline in population suggests a 
lesser demand for commercial developments in the areas that are 
exclusively oriented to a neighborhood clientele. 



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B. Comparative Economic and Labor Force Characteristics 

« 

This section focuses on occupational characteristics, 
family income, and educational characteristics of Census 
Tract 2 in comparison with the City of Gainesville. It is 
recognized that employment characteristics of 1644 residents 
are closely tied to, and cannot be isolated from, employment 
trends and land use patterns for the overall Gainesville 
Urban Area. 

Table 6 indicates that there is a great imbalance in the 
racial distribution of employment in Gainesville. The vast 
majority of those employed (77.6%) are employed in either 
skilled or semi-skilled occupations; whereas, only 36.4% 
of the black population in census tract 2 are in these 
occupations . 



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Table 6* 



Percent Distribution^ Occupational Characteristics - 
Census Tract 2; Gainesville 1970 



Total Employed, 16 yrs. & over 

Skilled & Semi-skilled Occupations 

Professional, technical & 
kindred workers 

Managers, administrators, 
except farm 

Sales workers 

Clerical & kindred workers 

Craftsmen, foremen & 
kindred workers 

Operations, except transport 

Transport equipment operations 

Unskilled Occupations 

Laborers, except farm 
Farm workers 
Service workers 
Private household workers 



Gainesville 



24,140 



30.7% 



77.6% 

4.1% 
0.7% 

12.7% 
2.9% 

20.4% 



Census Census 

Tract 2, Tract 2, 
Both Black 

Races Population 



2,386 



21.2% 



60.0% 



1,120 



5.4% 



8.1% 


2.4% 


1.3% 


7.4% 


3.9% 


1.0% 


19.6% 


15.6% 


4.8% 


7.5% 


8.6% 


t 
12.1% 


4.3% 


4.7% 


5.6% 


2.1% 


4.1% 


6.2% ! 



36.4% 



8.6% 


13.1% 


0.4% 


0.4% 


22.5% 


32.3% 


8.5% 


17.8% 



40.0% 



63.8% 



*See page _1 , "Limitations of Data for explanation of same 

Source: U.S. Census 



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For Census Tract 2, and more specifically for the black 
population of tract 2 in which 1644 is located, just the 
opposite is true; the vast majority of those employed 
(63.3%) are employed as laborers and unskilled service 
workers. 

This imbalance in the distribution among occupational 
groups is similarly reflected in family income differences 
as shown in Tables 7 , 8 , and 9 . * 

Table 7 
Percent Distribution, 1969 Family Income - 
Census Tract 2; Gainesville 

Census Census 
Tract 2, Tract 2, 
Income of Families and Both Black 

Unrelated Individuals Gainesville Races Population 

Less than $4,000 2,569-18.8% 403-40.1% 302-52.6% 

$4,000 - 5,999 1,909-13.9% 184-18.3% 129-22.5% 

$6,000 - 7,999 1,789-13.1% 119-11.9% 59-10.3% 

$8,000 - 9,999 1,669-12.2% 71- 7.1% 23- 4.0% 

$10,000 or more 5,753-42.0% 227-22.6% 61-10.6% 

All Families 13,689 1,004 574 



*See page 1 , "Limitations of Data for explanation of same 
Source: U.S. Census 



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Table 8 
Comparative 1969 Family Income Characteristics 



Census Census 
Tract 2, Tract 2, 
Both Black 

Gainesville Races Population 

All Families 13,689 1,004 574 

Median Family Income $ 8,655 $ 5,056 $ 3,754 

Mean Family Income 10,443 6,682 — NA — 

Percent Families with 
Incomes Below 50% 
of Poverty Level 5.6% 11.8% 15.3% 

Percent Families Below 

Poverty Level 14.0% 34.7% 52.3% 

-or- -or- -or- 

1,917 Families 348 Families 300 Families 

Median Income: 

Families & Unrelated 

Individuals $3,250 $1,793 $2,465 

Mean Income: 

Families & Unrelated 

Individuals $5,903 $3,244 — NA — 

Percent of Families & 
Unrelated Individuals 
Receiving Public 
Assistance Income 25.9% 40.0% 61.4% 



Source: U.S. Census 



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Table 9 

Education and Employment by Occupational Grouping and Race, 1970 

No. & % of Persons %of Employed 

25 yrs. & over Com- Persons Working 

Persons 25 yrs. pleting 8 grades or in *Unskilled 

and over Less Occupations 

Census Tract 2 1,531 791-51.7% 63.6% 

(Black Population) 

Census Tract 2 2,539 893-35.0% 40.0% 

(Both Races) 

Gainesville City 26,857 5,234-19.5% 20.4% 

Population (All 

Races) 



It can be concluded that the population in census tract 2 
is relatively poorer, concentrated in unskilled job categories, 
has less formal education, and has a higher percentage of persons 
receiving some type of public assistance income. 

The relative impoverishment of 1644 residents is important 
to considerations of future residential development in the area. 
Unless more affluent residents can be attracted, it would seem 
appropriate that additional housing in the area be aimed at lower- 
income families. 



Source: U.S. Census 

* (Unskilled Occupation = laborers, farm workers, service workers, 
private household workers.) 



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C. Transportation 

Like other areas of the city, existing streets are 
narrow and are laid out in a rectangular grid iron pattern. 
At one time, in days by-gone, the streets were more than 
adequate but have since become obsolete in their capacity 
to handle contemporary traffic loads. 

There are two perspectives from which to view traffic 
problems in enumeration district 1644: from the standpoint 
of more localized traffic generated by residential and 
commercial activities within 1644 itself, or from the stand- 
point of city-wide traffic passing through the area to and 
from various activity centers; particularly the University of 
Florida. 

The city has for a long time recognized the localized 
traffic congestion problems generated mostly by residential 
and commercial activities within enumeration district 1644. 
In 1970, the city Traffic Engineering Department completed an 
investigation into the installation of speed limit signs and 
for the possibility of "one-waying" NW 5th Avenue, between 
NW 13th and NW 6th Street. This investigation was prompted 
by a search for a more feasible alternative to street-widening 
for the purpose of relieving traffic congestion. 

One-way streets are usually installed in "pairs" on closely 
oriented, parallel streets. An exception to this would be on a 
short, one or two-block street that is too narrow for two-way 
operation. 



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It was determined that the only "pairs " of parallel streets 
of sufficient width and/or sufficient length would be NW 7th 
and NW 3rd Avenues. However, these two streets are too far 
from NW 5th Avenue and do not have the proper connecting 
streets necessary to provide the circulation required for 
safe and efficient one-way operation. 

The investigation further indicated that because of the 
volume of traffic (2,900 cars daily at that time), the accident 
experience, together with the narrow pavement, parked cars, 
buses and small delivery trucks, an undue traffic hazard is 
created for motorists using NW 5th Avenue. 

To reduce the accident experience and accident potential, 
and thereby improve the overall traffic flow and pedestrian 
safety, it was recommended that parking be prohibited on 
both sides of NW 5th Avenue, between NW 3rd and NW 13th Streets. 
In order to remove the existing on-street parking, the report 
further indicated that additional driveway curb openings and 
off-street parking facilities would have to be constructed. 

Existing traffic flow problems have important implications 
for future neighborhood preservation and revitalization efforts 
in the community. The resolution of traffic congestion on 5th 
Avenue is a key factor to any future business developments in 
the community. Unless adequate off-street parking is available 
to potential business patrons, the expansion of existing businesses 
or the introduction of new businesses is highly unlikely. 



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There are, however, other traffic problems resulting 
primarily from the geographical location of enumeration district 
1644 in relation to major activity centers in the city. 

The two major activity centers in Gainesville are the 
University of Florida and the Central Business District in 
which governraent buildings and financial institutions are 
located. Enumeration district 1644 is located less than one 
mile from both of these activity centers. An added influence 
on traffic congestion in and around 1644 is the fact that it is 
wedged between the Central Business District and suburban 
housing developments in the outer northv;est quadrant of the 
city. 

Therefore, because of the geographic location of enumeration 
district 1644, a whirlwind of traffic moving around and 
through the area is generated. An examination of average 
daily traffic counts of the major streets in close proximity 
to enumeration district 1644 boundaries illustrates this point: 



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Table 10 



1974 ADT's For Periphey Streets to 1644 



Description 



Street Classification 



APT (approximate) 



1. *Eastern Periphery Thoroughfare 
(N. Main Street) 

2. Western Periphery Major Thoroughfare 

(N.W. 13th Street) 

3. Northern Periphery Major Thoroughfare 

(N.V?. 8th Avenue) 

4. *Southern Periphery Major Thoroughfare 
(VJ. Univ. Avenue) 



13,000 - 16,000 



24,500 - 26,000 



12,000 - 14,500 



19,800 



Source: Gainesville Traffic Engineering Department 

* (The actual eastern and southern boundaries of 1644 are NW 
2nd Street and NW 2nd and 3rd Avenues respectively. Main Street 
and University Avenue are in very close proximity to these 
boundaries . ) 



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A comprehensive investigation of city-wide traffic conditions 
and physical characteristics of street intersections was under- 
taken in 1972 (Gainesville Urban Area TOPICS Study) to determine 
the necessity for traffic signal installation, and to furnish 
necessary data for the proper design and operation of traffic 
signals that were found to be warranted. 

The following data, which is presented in inventory format, 
was taken from the TOPICS study and focuses on recommended 
solutions to traffic problems in the area; viewing it from the 
standpoint of city-wide traffic passing through enumeration 
district 1644 to and from various other activity centers: 



Table 11 
Recommended Intersection Improvements, Enumeration District 1644 



Intersections 

1. NW 13th Street 
and 
NW 7th Avenue 



2. NW 13th Street 
and 
NW 5th Avenue 



Recommendations 

a. Remove parking and restripe 13th 
to provide five lane operation 
with a continuous left turn lane. 

b. Provide standard signal install- 
ation with a two phase, coordinated 
semi-actuated controller. 

a. Remove parking, restripe 13th to 
provide a five lane ofjeration with 
a continuous left turn lane. 

b. Provide standard signalization with 
three phase, coordinated, semi- 
actuated controller. Also provide 
pedestrian signals for school 
children--protected left turn 
phase for the south necessary 

to provide adequate capacity and 
additional accident reduction 
potential . 



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Intersections 



Recommendations 



3. NW 13th Street 
and 
NW 3rd Avenue 



Remove parking and restripe to 
provide five lane operation on 
13th with a continuous left 
turn lane. 



4. NW 10th Street 
and 
NW 8th Avenue 



Provide standard signal 
installation with a coordinated 
two phase semi-actuated 
controller. 

Remove parking on 8th Avenue 
and provide left turn lane. 

Provide standard signal 
installation with a two phase 
semi-actuated controller when 
the proposed one-way operation 
of 10th Street is extended to 
8th Avenue. 



NW 10th Street 

and 
NW 7th Avenue 



6. NW 10th Street 
and 
NVJ 5 th Avenue 



7. NW 8th Avenue 
and 
NW 6th Avenue 



Convert 10th Street to one-way 
northbound as part of a one-way 
pair with 12th Street. 

Provide standard signal 
installation with a two phase 
seiai-actuated controller. Provide 
pedestrian indications for 
southbound pedestrians. Provide 
pedestrian bushbuttons. 

Convert 10th Street to one-way 
northbound as a part of a one- 
way pair with 12th Street. 

Provide standard signal install- 
ation with two phase semi-actuated 
controller. Provide pedestrian 
signals and pushb ttons for 
school crossing. 

Widen north, west and south 
legs to provide five lanes on 
each street and reduce offsets. 
Right-of-way required on 6th 
Street. 







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Intersections 

8. NW 8th Avenue 
and 
NW 4th Street 



Recommendations 

a. Retain two phase semi-actuated 
controller but provide dual 
indicators on 4th Street 
approaches. Retain pedestrian 
signals and pushbuttons. 



9. NW 10th-12th Street One-way Pair 

Both 10th and 12th Streets currently operate two-way between 
SW 8th Avenue and NW 16th Avenue and pass through enumeration 
district 1644. Sections of both streets north of 5th Avenue 
would require major reconstruction prior to handling larger 
volumes of traffic. These sections lack proper drainage and 
have only minimum pavement thickness at the present. 

The existing two-way arrangement provides a low level of 
overall service to traffic south of University Avenue. Lack 
of signal coordination and the interference from parking 
vehicles contribute to the overall problem. 

This proposed one-way pairing of the two streets would 
provide significant relief to existing problems. Such a 
realignment would provide an alternative north-south route 
in the area other than 12th Street, and facilitate a better 
overall traffic progression. 

It should be noted that these streets are also designated 
by the TOPICS Study as bicycle routes. Should this occur, 
the proposed one-way pairing would allow for safer bicycle 
paths by reducing the number of vehicle conflicts. 



Source:^ Gainesville Urban Area Topics Study, 1972 



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Section III: Inventory of Existing Land Uses 

A. Residential Development 

B. Profile of 1644 Neighborhood 

Oriented Commercial Developments 

C. Summary of Land Use Inventory, E. D. 

1644 



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A. Residential Development 

This section presents, in inventory and map form, the 
following factors related to residential development: 

(1) Housing supply; 

(2) Housing quality; 

(3) Detailed characteristics of single family residence 
by Traffic Zone (Housing values, land area, building 
area and age of structure) . 

Table 12 
1. Housing Supply, E. D. 1644, 1974 



Total number of residential units 
Number of single family structures 
Number of multi-family structures 

(mostly single story two-family duplexes) 
Total number of residential structures 
Total number of non-residential properties 
Percent Rental Units (approximate) 



731 

507 (89.6%) 
59 (10.4%) 

566 
210 
68% 



Source: Print-out of Property Assessment and Land Use File, 
1974 



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Table 13 
2. Summary of Structural Quality of Dwelling Units, E. D. 1644, 1972 



Total Units 

To Be Cleared 

In Need of Major Rehabilitation 

In Need of Minor Rehabilitation 

Rated Standard 



Number 


Percentage 


731 


100.0 


3 


.004 


127 


.17 


13 


.02 


588 


.80 



Source: Intensive Area Development Plan, 1974 



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Table 14 
3 . Averages for Housing Value, Land Area, Building Area and Age of 
Structure for Single Family Residences by Traffic Zones, E. D. 1644 



Mean 



TZ 31 

*Land Building Age of Total 

Area (ft^) Area (ft^) Structure (yrs.) Value {$ 



6,808 1,480 34 $ 9,807 

Total Number Single-Family Structures = 50 



Mean 



TZ 32 
6,843 1,341 42 $ 5,367 

Total Number Single-Family Structures = 70 



Mean 



TZ 33 
7,441 1,442 38 $ 5,718 

Total Number Single-Family Structures = 66 



Mean 



TZ 34 
7,221 1,483 39 $ 6,616 

Total Number Single-Family Structures - 132 



TZ 35 

Mean 6,696 1,487 42 $ 5,823 

Total Number Single-Family Structures - 189 

*In order to gain some idea of the actual lot sizes — 
a 100' X 100' size lot has an area of 10,000 ft^, a 50' 
X 100' has an area of 5,000 ft^. 

Source: Print-out of Property Assessment and Land Use 
File, 1974. 



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Table 15 



B. Profile of 1644 Neighborhood Oriented 
Commercial Developments 



Industry Type 

A. Business Repair Services 

B. Professional Services - Drs . Banks & 
Cosby 

C. Restaurants 

D. Entertainment & Recreation 

E. Funeral Home 

F. Personal Services - (includes White 
owned Karate Do jo) 

G. Confectioneries/Sundries 
H. Liquidated Businesses 

I. Retail Trade 

Manufacturing 

Finance, Insurance & Real Estate 
J. Construction (General Contractor) 



Liquidated 
Businesses* 



Number 



2 
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3 

10 

1 

2 



1 
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*Determined by vacated business structures 
Source: Field Survey, May, 1975 



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Table 16 
C. Summary of Land Use Inventory, E. D. 1644 



Use 
Residential 

Single-Family 

Two-Family 

Multiple-Family 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Warehouse & 

Wholesalers 
Institutional 
Offices 

Undeveloped (vacant) 
Other Developed 

Major Uses (includes 

1 park) 15 

Other Developed 

Minor Uses 1 

Transportation 



Number of 
Units 


Land 
Area (ft^) 

4,049,500 


% of Total 
Land Area 

50.6% 


% of Total 
Developed 
Land Area 


878 


57.9% 


614 


3,425,500 




42.8% 


46.1% 


158 


425,700 




5.3% 


9.0% 


106 


198,300 




2.5% 


2.8% 


69 


393,900 




4.9% 


5.6% 


5 


52,400 




0.7% 


0.7% 



3 


15,300 


0.2% 


0.2% 


17 


531,300 


6.6% 


7.6% 


3 








120 


1,006,700 


12.6% 






208,800 



13,200 



2.6% 



0.2% 



Parking (Police station parking 
area) 30,000 

Streets (for total E.D.) 1,484,825 
Railroad Property & RR R/W 223,075 

Total Land Area (ft ) = 7,995,800 ft^ 

9 2 

Total Developed Land Area (ft"^) = 6,989,100 ft 

Source: Property Assessment and Land Use File, 1974. 



3.0% 



0.2% 



0.4% 


0.4% 


18.6% 


21.2% 


2.8% 


3.2% 


100.0% 


100.0% 



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,1 III! 



Section IV: Planning Issues and 
Neighborhood Improvement Strategies, E. D. 1644 

Introduction 

A. Rehabilitation and Deterioration Defined 

B. Planning Issues and Strategies 

1. Redevelopment and Neighborhood Conservation 

2. Pressures Toward Land Use Transition 

3. Housing Deterioration 

4. Community Facilities Improvement 

5. Transportation 

6. Neighborhood Commercial Center Decline 

7. Citizen Participation - The Inner City Neighborhood 

Development Association (ICNDA) 

C. Community Development Budget Priorities, 1975 



41 



Introduction 

Enumeration District 1644 /as a location of lower-income 
housing, is conveniently located to public transit and a range 
of public services which are especially important to lower-income 
households. When one considers the existing level of citizen 
interest in maintaining and improving housing conditions in the 
area, it is evident that conservation, as opposed to massive 
clearance and removal, should be the focal point of community 
development plans for the area. It simply is no longer acceptable 
to conduct large scale clearance programs in the tradition of old 
urban renewal programs. 3ut in order for any type of conservation 
and redevelopment efforts to succeed, they must be conducted with 
the support and understanding of the residents to be affected by 
such efforts. 



42 



A. Rehabilitation and Deterioration Defined 

Before discussing various types of renewal treatment and 
then priorities for implementation, it is appropriate at this 
point to specify what is meant by "rehabilitation" and 
"deterioration. " 
Rehabilitation 

Rehabilitation can be defined as the restoration to good 
structural condition without changes in floor plan, style or 
form. This definition contrasts with; remodeling, which consists 
of changing the floor plan, form or style to correct functional 
deficiencies; and with modernization, which can be defined as the 
replacement of outmoded structural elements and equipment with 
contemporary structural elements and equipment. 

Rehabilitation is generally classified as major or minor 
rehabilitation based on the type of work required and the cost 
involved. Units requiring minor repairs usually can be brought 
up to minimum housing code standards at relatively low costs. 
On the other hand major rehabilitation is more difficult and more 
costly. Major rehabilitation would involve such work items as a 
new roof, rewiring, new plumbing or a new heating system. 

Because major rehabilitation can be very costly, an 
overriding question is deciding the tipping point beyond which 
major rehabilitation is economically unfeasible and that 
demolition and clearance would be the better approach. Of course, 
the concept of rehabilitation may be applied to the improvement 
or consolidation of commercial and industrial activities adjacent 
to or dispersed within a residential area. 

43 



Deterioration 

A deteriorated condition, for the purposes of this report, 
is generally defined by one or most of the following conditions: 

(1) Substantial and increasing physical dilapidation 

by reason of age or inadequate maintenance (particularly 
characteristic of renter-occupied and absentee-owned 
property) ; 

(2) Defective construction; 

(3) Defective arrangement and/or obsolescence of buildings; 

(4) Obsolete or inadequate street pattern; 

(5) Faulty lot layout in relation to size or accessibility; 

(6) Excessive lot coverage; 

(7) Improper and obsolete platting; 

(8) An overall shortage of community facilities, including 
recreation/park areas and off-street parking facilities. 



44 



B. Planning Issues and Strategies 

1, Issue - Redevelopment and Neighborhood Conservation 
A reversal of deteriorating conditions in E. D. 1644 can 
be accomplished by implementing a coordinated program combining 
redevelopment, rehabilitation and conservation measures. 
Redevelopment would be appropriate for areas where 
small scale clearance and rebuilding are the only alternatives 
for insuring a more desirable environment. Over the long run, 
redevelopment is appropriate for areas characterized by a 
host of deteriorated conditions; structural obsolescence, 
improper platting and arrangement of buildings, excessive 
lot coverage, etc. 
Strategy 

(a) Demolition, clearance and new construction 

of medium density multiple family developments. 

(b) Provision of suitable alternative housing for 
any occupants displaced. 

Conservation, another program approach, seeks to prevent 
further deterioration in areas in the very early stages of decline. 
The conservation approach, like the redevelopment approach, focuses 
on groups of houses as opposed to individual housing units. 

Strategy 

(a) minor and major rehabilitation. 



(b) Concentrated enforcement of housing and building 
codes whereby all coimnercial and residential 
properties in 1644 would be inspected for code 
violations and the penalties for such violations 
appropriately enforced. 

(c) Financial assistance for residential and 
commercial or "storefront" rehabilitation. 

(d) Clearance and demolition only when required to 
faciliate redevelopment or re-use as park areas. 

(e) Adoption of a land use and a conservation district 
zoning plan for the 1644 area. 

2 . Issue - Pressures Toward Land Use Transition 
The demand for suitable land for apartment and commercial 
development creates a potential pressure to demolish and clear 
the older, structurally obsolete and lower value homes. At least 
two factors contribute to this pressure: 

(a) Absentee landlords, who own approximately 7 0% 
of the residential properties, may be inclined 
to sell and thereby potentially open the way for 
redevelopment to nonresidential uses, thereby 
destroying the predominantly residential character 
of the area. 

(b) The likelihood of Downtown Redevelopment adds an 
additional pressure tov>7ard apartment and/or 
commercial development in lower value rental areas 
around the CBD vicinity. 



46 



r r 



The continued growth of the overall city population 
stimulates a greater demand for better and wider traffic 
arteries linking suburban developments and the CBD activity 
centers. The impact of widening NW 6th Street, for example, 
would drastically affect residential, commercial and public 
uses along this route. 

Strategy 

(a) Those areas presently in a state of 
transition (or deterioration) should 
be designated on the Land Use Plan 
as medium density housing locations, 
as opposed to being designated for 
future nonresidential uses. 

(b) Implementation of a home ownership 
transfer program or a type of lease- 
purchase arrangement whereby property 
ownership would be transferred from 
absentee landlords to owners who reside 
in the community presently as renters. 

3 . Issue - Housing Deterioration 

Because of the high percentage of renter-occupied units ^ 
code enforcement and rehabilitation programs will only have a 
minute impact on the 1644 housing stock as a whole. Essentially, 
code enforcement and rehabilitation seek to maintain or improve 
the status of housing by arresting physical dilapidation. 



47 



However, code enforcement and rehabilitation do not necessarily 
address other conditions of deterioration such as structural age 
and obsolescence, faulty lot layout, excessive lot coverage, and 
improper and obsolete platting. Over the long run, limited 
demolition, clearance and redevelopment would be appropriate for 
many of these conditions. 

It is a well established fact that homeownership promotes 
neighborhood stability, community pride and a high level of property 
maintenance. The neighborhoods which are most stable and where 
homes are well maintained invariably have a high percentage of 
owner-occupied houses. Although homeownership is no cure-all 
for housing deterioration in 1644, it has sufficient merit to be 
considered as the major community development program to stabilize, 
preserve and upgrade overall housing conditions in 1644. 

Strategy 

(a) Financial assistance for major and minor 
rehabilitation of residential structures. 

(b) Concentrated code enforcement. 

(c) Implementation of a homeownership transfer 
program or a type of lease-purchase 
arrangement whereby property ownership would be 
transferred from absentee landlords to owners 
who reside in the community currently as 
renters. This is an adaptation of the "urban 
homesteading" concept, the difference being 
that urban homesteading projects are based on 
transferring ownership of vacant and abandoned 



48 



structures. Since there are few vacant and 
abandoned structures in 1644, the ownership 
transfer would be between the city and renter 
occupants. This would require that the city 
first purchase the property from absentee 
owners . 
4 . Issue - Community Facilities Improvement 

There is a need for upgrading existing community facilities, 
particularly tot-lot and recreation centers so that they become 
more attractive and more usable to the 1644 population. Instructional 
programs should be designed and funded to accommodate the leisure 
time needs of both the elderly and younger population subgroups. 

The major community facility need, however, is for public 
off-street parking facilities on NW 5th Avenue to relieve traffic 
congestion and to improve the flow of traffic. 
Strategy 
Public investments for: 

(a) Land acquisition for use as recreation/park 
areas. 

(b) Land acquisition for use as off-street parking 
facilities along 5th Avenue. 

(c) Installing sidewalks (5th and 7th Avenue) , 
curbs and gutters and correcting existing 
drainage deficiencies. 

(d) Improving traffic control devices. 



49 



5. Issue - Transportation 
Strategy 

(a) Relieve traffic congestion on 5th Avenue, 
the neighborhood commercial center, by 
establishing public off-street parking 
facilities; and at the same time prohibiting 
on-street parking on both sides of NW 5th 
Avenue. 

(b) Install traffic control devices and innovative 
pedestrian walkways. 

6 . Issue - Neighborhood Commercial Center Decline 
The decline of the neighborhood commercial area in 

1644 is not unusual in the era of "one-stop" shopping at outlying 
chain stores and shopping centers. The convenience of ample 
free parking at shopping centers and the variety of merchandise 
available make these facilities more attractive to shoppers 
with automobiles. 

All of these factors suggest it is unlikely that NW 5th Avenue 
could ever be upgraded enough to where there is a balance of stores 
providing the basic goods and services. 

The central issue is how to revitalize NW 5th Avenue as the 
commercial center of the 1644 area without attempting to compete 
with chain stores and shopping centers for clientele. Therefore, 
the commercial revitalization of NW 5th Avenue could best be 
achieved by building upon its uniqueness in terms of being a 
restaurant-entertainment-commercial district for a significant 
portion of Gainesville's black and white population. 



50 



strategy 

(a) Public and private investments for more street 
lighting, street furniture, pedestrian walkway 
improvements, and off-street parking lots. 

(b) Implementation of commercial storefront 
rehabilitation program whereby businessmen 
making repairs to upgrade their establishments 
would receive a rebate covering a certain 
percentage of the total renovation costs (15-3 0' 
of the total cost for example) . 

7 . Issue - Citizen Participation 

The historical information regarding this planning issue 
is included in order to outline citizen participation efforts 
to date in E. D. 1644. 

Inner City Neighborhood Development Association (ICNDA) 

The ICNDA is an organization of citizens who reside in 
and who represent other citizens in E. D. 1644. The origin of 
the association dates back to April of 1974, when a community 
meeting was held at the train depot on NW 6th Street. 

A substantial number of citizens attended this gathering to 
voice their concern for improving the community as a desirable 
place to live. At a meeting held one week later a steering 
committee and chairperson were elected. Since that time, the 
steering committee has functioned as an important link between the 
planning division and citizens to be affected by improvement and 
redevelopment plans initiated by the city. 



51 



The origin of the city's involvement in the area dates 
back to February of 1974, when the planning division presented a 
study to the City Commission entitled "Intensive Area Development 
Plan, 1974." The City Commission approved the findings of 
this report and subsequently authorized the following. 

(1) Selecting E. D. 1644 as the initial neighborhood for 
an Intensive Area Development Plan. 

(2) Staffing a temporary branch office of the planning 
division to better work with residents and to 
gather citizen input; and 

(3) Developing a land use plan and a new zoning plan 
which adequately considers the needs and preferences 
of the people. 



52 



C. Community Development Budget Priorities^ 197 5 

Under the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 
the City of Gainesville is earmarked to receive $348,000 in 
1975, $600,000 is 1976 and $1,000,000 in 1977. Outlined 
below are the priorities for community development as 
reflected by budget allocations of the first year (1975) block 
grant funds. 

Table 17 
Community Development Budget Priorities (1975) 

Rehabilitation loans and grants $142,600 

Planning and management development 3 5,500 
Contingencies and/or unspecified local option--activities 32,000 

Public works facilities, site improvements 28,900 

Acquisition or real property 20,000 

Clearance, demolition, rehabilitation 15,000 

Relocation payments and assistance 14,000 

Code enforcement 10,000 

Administration 50,000 



53 



Section V: Conservation District Plan, Enumeration District 1644 



Introduction 

A. Purpose and Objectives 

B. Definition of Conservation District 

C. Land Use Provisions 

D. Use Districts 

E. Amendments to the Approved 

Conservation District Plan 

F. R-lc Lot and Building Requirements 

G. Special Regulations 



54 



Introduction 

Within a framework of neighborhood conservation, the 
Conservation District Plan for enumeration district 1644 
is intended to outline general directions for future new 
developments and improvements to existing commercial and 
residential uses in the area. 

The plan, and the accompanying zoning proposed to implement 
it, recognizes the long standing mixture of uses located closely 
together in enumeration district 1644. 3y so doing, it places 
little emphasis on the traditional strict separation of 
different land uses. 

With the adoption and legal recording of the Conservation 
District Plan, all uses existing prior to its adoption will be 
considered to be conforming. 



55 



A. Purpose 

The basic goal is to encourage improvements to 
existing uses and to promote the construction of new 
developments within the Conservation District boundaries 
that are in keeping with the overall density and land use 
pattern of the area; and which are in keeping with the open 
space objectives of the Comprehensive Development Plan, while 
departing from the strict application of setback and minimum 
lot size requirements. 

Objectives of Conservation District Plan 

(1) To promote a more desirable living environment 

than would be possible through the strict application 
of minimum dimension requirements of traditional 
zoning and subdivision regulations. 

(2) To promote the most efficient and economic use of land 

(3) To promote the revitalization and conservation of 
enumeration district 1644 primarily as a residential 
area. 

(4) To eliminate the nonconforming status of residential 
uses classified as such prior to the adoption of 
the Conservation District Plan. 

(5) To regulate the insertion of new uses into the 
existing land use pattern without adverse impacts on 
adjacent properties. 



56 



B. Definition of Conservation District Plan 

The Conservation District Plan is a plan that when adopted 
becomes the land use development and zoning control instrument 
for the area to which it is applied. The plan consists of a 
prescribed land use pattern including streets, building locations, 
permitted uses and related dimension requirements. 

The Conservation District is a single district in which 
several uses are permitted, provided that the required planning 
standards are met. The plan includes specific requirements for 
off-street parking, site plan approval and other special 
regulations. It also contains provisions which depart from the 
strict application of setback and minimum lot size requirements. 
After adoption of the Conservation District Plan, any major 
changes in the plan must be in accordance with the procedures 
set forth in "Amendments to the Approved Conservation District 
Plan." 



57 



C. Land Use Provisions 

The Conservation District Plan indicates the type 
and location of various land uses permitted in enumeration 
district 1644. The plan consists of five different land use 
districts: residential, mixed residential and limited 
commercial, general commercial, mixed residential and 
administrative-professional, and warehouse-wholesale. 

Certain areas in the plan are labeled as mixed use districts 
and, therefore, have more than one land use category indicated. 
In such areas, either of the uses would be permitted. 

Any use not so indicated on the Conservation Plan should 
be considered as a prohibited use. 



1 



D. Use Districts and Permitted Uses 

1 

* 

(1) Residential Districts 

' (a) Single family detached dwellings, including 

1 the leasing and renting of rooms in such 

dwellings, provided the number of tenants in 
] each dwelling does not violate the Housing Code. 

(b) Multiple family dwellings (excluding dormitories) 
not to exceed 15 units per acre. 

(c) Churches and other houses of worship, including 
convents and rectories, but only in conjunction 
with churches. 

(d) Public recreational facilities and buildings. 

(2) Mixed Residential and Limited Commercial District 



,1 



] 



All of the uses permitted in the residential districts are 
also permitted in this district, in additional to the following 
limited commercial uses: 

(a) Retail-commercial sales and services: 

1 

(1) Food stores; 

(2) Dry good stores; 

(3) Household and family service establishments; 

(4) Recreation and sports stores; 

(5) Drug stores, pharmacies and apothecaries; 

J (6) Other similar sales and service businesses, 

-^ except those prohibited in Section 29-8.32 

J f 

(proposed Gainesville Zoning Ordinance) . 

1 



59 



(b) Personal service establishments; 

(c) Business service establishments, excluding 
office furniture stores; 

(d) Professional services and studios; 

(e) Finance and small loan companies; 

(f) Commercial parking lots and garages; 

(g) Government buildings and services; 

(h) Public and private utilities, excluding 

sanitary landfills, incinerators, refuse and 
and trash dumps (See Section 29-19.13, proposed 
Gainesville Zoning Ordinance.) 
(3) General Commercial District 

(a) Eating establishments, including drive-in 
restaurants; 

(b) Retail-commercial sales and services, 
including but not limited to the following: 

(1) Food stores; 

(2) Dry good stores; 

(3) Furniture and appliance stores; 

(4) Household and family service establishments; 

(5) Recreation and sports stores; 

(6) Commercial recreational facilities; 

(7) Drugstores, pharmacies or apothercaries; 

(8) Handicraft goods and services; 

(9) Other similar retail-commercial sales and 
services, except those in Section 29-8.42. 



60 



l\ 



(c) Gasoline service stations and car washes (See 
Section 29-19.8) ; 

(d) Business and personal service establishments; 

(e) Professional services; 

(f) Studio uses of: 

(1) Artist galleries and studios; 

(2) Photographic studios, including the taking 
of photographs or portrait settings, and 
development of film, but not photographic 
processing labs; 

(3) Music studios, when made fully soundproof, 
but not including dance halls; 

(4) Dance studios, but not including dance halls; 

(5) Interior design studios; 

(6) Radio and television studios, but not 
including transmitting towers; 

(7) Educational speciality studios; 

(8) Other similar studio uses. 

(g) Churches and other houses of worship, including 
convents and rectories, but only in conjunction with 
churches; 

(h) Financial institutions, including full service banks, 

savings and loan institutions, and drive-in facilities; 
(i) Governmental buildings and services; 



61 



(j) Commercial parking lots and garages; 

(k) Educational and scientific research offices, except 

laboratories; 
(1) Veterinary hospitals or clinics; 
(m) Public and private utilities, excluding sanitary 

land fills, incinerators, refuse and trash 

dumps; 
(n) Compound uses. 

( 4 ) Mixed Residential and Administrative-Professional District 
All residential uses permitted in the residential districts 

are also permitted in this district, in addition to the following 
administrative and professional uses: 

(a) Professional services; 

(b) Financial institutions excluding full service 
banks and savings and loan institutions; 

(c) Business service establishments; 

(d) Studio uses: 

(1) Artist galleries and studios; 

(2) Photography studios, but not photo processing 
labs; 

(3) Music studios, excluding dance halls; 

(4) Dance studios, excluding dance halls; 

(5) Interior design studios; 

(6) Other similar studios. 

(5) Warehouse-Wholesale District 

(a) Warehouse and storage concerns; 

(b) Wholesaling concerns; 



62 



I 

t 

I 

I 



! 



I 



1 



(c) Bottling plants; 

(d) Retail commercial sales and services: 

(1) Lumber and building materials; 

(2) Contractors shops, yards and exterminators; 

(3) Equipment rentals and storage services, except 
for heavy machinery or farm equipment rentals 
and storage services; 

(4) Photographic processing and blueprinting; 

(5) Railroad and freight terminals. 
(6) Accessory Structures Permitted 

All accessory structures customarily located and constructed 
with any one of the above permitted principal structures are also 
permitted. 



63 



E. Amendments to the Approved Conservation District Plan 

Minor Changes - in the Conservation District Plan will be 
authorized by the staff (Building Inspector) . 

(1) A minor change is any change or structural expansion 
that conforms to R-lc dimension requirements. 

(2) Dimension requirements which are less restrictive 
than the R-lc requirements may be authorized by the 
staff, so long as the following procedure and minimum 
distances between buildings are adhered to: 

(a) Minimum side distance between buildings - 10 feet 

(or less under some conditions to be determined 
by the staff) . 

(b) Minimum rear distance between buildings - 40 feet 

(or less under some conditions to be determined 
by the staff) . 

(c) The following procedure will apply in granting 
approval for structural expansion in which there 
would be less than 10 feet minimum side distance 
between buildings, or less than 40 feet minimum 
rear distance between buildings: 

Abutting property owners must be made aware 
of and must consent to applying the less 
restrictive minimum side or rear distance 
between buildings; the objective being to 
protect and insure equal property expansion 
rights of the abutting property owners. 



64 



(d) Minimum front yard - structural expansion into 
the front yard will be considered as minor 
provided that such expansion does not exceed 
the average actual setback distances for other 
structures on the same block face. 

(e) Corner lot, street side yard - in the case of a 
corner lot, structural expansion into the street 
side yard will be considered minor provided 
that such expansion does not exceed the average 
actual setback distances for other structures 

on the same block face. 
Major Changes - in the Conservation District Plan must be 
authorized by the Planning Board after reviewing written 
recommendations from the staff. 

(1) Changes in the use districts designated on the Land 
Use Plan, 

(2) All nonresidential development. 

(3) All multiple family residential development. 



65 



[. 



ill 
i 



Table 18 
F. R-lc Lot and Building Requirements 

The principal building and accessory building shall 
be located and constructed in accordance with the following 
requirements: 



Minimum lot area 

Minimum lot width 
at building line 

Minimum lot depth 

Minimum front yard 

Minimum rear yard 

Minimum side yard, interior 

Minimum side yard, street 

Maximum percent of lot coverage 

Maximum building height 

Minimum setback from lot line 
for accessory buildings: 

Rear 
Side 



6,000 feet 

60 feet 

90 feet 

25 feet 

20 feet 

Ih feet 

10 feet 

35 % 

35 feet or 2 stories 



7h feet same as 
principal building 



66 



G. Special Regulations 

The following regulations incorporated in the 
proposed Gainesville Zoning Ordinance will also apply as 
required: 

(1) Access; 

(2) Buffering and screening; 

(3) Off-street parking and loading facilities (See 
Section 29-20.14) ; 

(4) Parking, storing, keeping of commercial and 
recreational vehicles; 

(5) Home Occupations; 

(6) Landscaping; 

(7) Site Plan Approval Process; 

(8) City of Gainesville Street Graphics Ordinance. 



67 



n 




Appendix I 
Environmental Assessment of 
Land Use Plan, E. D. 1644 

1. Summary of proposed Land Use Plan, E. D. 1644 
The proposed Land Use Plan (or Conservation District 

Plan) for E. D. 1644 is a plan that when adopted becomes the 
land use development and the zoning control instrument for the 
area to which it is applied. The plan consists of a prescribed 
land use pattern including streets, building locations, permitted 
land uses and related .dimensional requirements. 

2. (a) Adverse environmental impacts should the Land 

Use Plan (or Conservation District Plan) be 
implemented: 

Adverse environmental effects likely to result from 
implementing the plan would be both temporary and permanent. 
Temporary adverse effects would consist of demolition, clearance 
and construction activities related to developing new land uses 
conforming to the plan. The movement of heavy equipment and 
materials necessary for construction activities would also cause 
a small scale, but temporary, disruption in the flow of pedestrian 
and automobile traffic. 

The i£sue of relocation could likely become a long term 
adverse environmental impact in cases where families or individuals 
are required to relocate thereby causing them to sever ties with 
familiar people and familiar places. 



69 



2. (b) Beneficial environmental impacts: 

1. Improved aesthetic environment stemming 

from the demolition and clearance of deteriorated 
areas and the construction of new structures; 

2. A supply of new and more modern housing; 

3. Additional recreational space; 

4. Increased stability of residential areas 
within E. D. 164 4; 

5. Decreased traffic congestion and increased 
public safety. 

2. (c) Unavoidable adverse environmental effects: 
(Refer to item 2-a). 

2. (d) Assessment of feasible alternatives to the E. D. 
1644 Land Use Plan: 

Alternative One : Assume that the Land Use Plan proposal 
for E. D. 1644 permits higher density multi- family improvements 
than what is permitted under the proposed plan. 

The highest density permitted by the plan proposal is 6-8 
units per acre. To permit a higher density level (9-14 units 
per acre) would directly conflict with the expressed desires of 
the 1644 citizenry on this issue. 

Alternative Two : Assume that the E. D. 1644 Land Use Plan 
proposal designates nonresidential uses for some areas within 1644 
currently used for residential purposes. 

This alternative would cause a decrease in the existing low 
and moderate income housing stock by replacing housing with 
nonresidential uses and thereby adding to the problem of inadequate 
housing for low and moderate income households. 

70 



Alternative Three: Assume the present situation is 
maintained; namely that there is no adopted Land Use Plan 
for E. D. 1644. 

This is untenable in that there is a great need for 
a land use development and zoning control instrument that 
seeks to maintain and upgrade E. D. 1644 as primarily a 
residential community. 

2. (e) Irreversible and irretrievable resource 

commitments involved if plan implemented: 

Should the plan be adopted, it would become a part 
of the Land Use Plan-Gainesville Urban Area, and would assume 
a legal status. The City Plan and the City Commission 
would then be committed to using the appropriate enforcement 
resources in relying on the plan as a land use and zoning control 
instrument for all planning decisions concerning the 1644 area. 

2. (f) Applicable local environmental controls or ordinances 

1. Landscaping; 

2. Buffering and Screening; 

3. Street Graphics; 

4. Site Plan Approval; 

5. Access; 

6. Home Occupations Ordinances; and 

7. Flood Control. 



71 



Major References 



Bureau of Business and Economic Research, College of Business 
Administration, Arizona State University. Economic 
Market Analysis: City of Phoenix, Booker T. Washington 
Neighborhood Development Program, 1974. 

Gainesville Department of Community Development, Intensive 
Area Development Plan , 1974. 

Gainesville Department of Community Development, Housing in 
Gainesville , 1973. 

Gainesville Redevelopment Act, 1973. 

Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc., Gainesville Urban Area 
Traffic Operations Program to Increase Capacity and 
Safety , (TOPICS) , 1972. 

McVoy, Edgar. Sociological Study of Gainesville, Florida 
1937. University of Florida Thesis. 

Miller. Negro Life in Gainesville , 1938. University of Florida 
Thesis . 

North Central Florida Regional Planning Council. Print-out 
of Property Assessment and Land Use File, 1974. 

Soto, Mario. A Community Center for the Black Community of 
Northwest Gainesville, Florida , 1973. (unpublished 
University of Florida report) 

U. S. Bureau of Census, 1960 and 1970. 



72 




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